Oregon

Rental Housing Journal Oregon Metro Portland and Valley

Rental Housing Journal is mailed monthly and published in association with Multifamily NW, Rental Housing Alliance Oregon, IREM & Clark County Association. Thank you to Oregon Web Press for publication.

November 2021

Portland Metro Rental Housing Journal helpful, useful content for rental property owners and managers

Oregon Valley Rental Housing Journal November 2021 helpful, useful information and news for rental property owners and managers

October 2021

Portland Oregon Metro Rental Housing Journal for October 2021 helpful, useful information for rental property owners and landlords

Valley

Oregon Valley Rental Housing Journal October 2021 helpful, useful content for landlords

September 2021

Portland Metro Rental Housing Journal September 2021

Oregon Valley Rental Housing Journal September 2021

August 2021

Portland Metro Rental Housing Journal August 2021

People moving around due to the pandemic and job changes or losses, government stimulus, and a hot housing market have all contributed to unprecedented levels of multifamily rent growth, Yardi Matrix says in its latest report.

“A slew of factors has pushed asking-rent growth across the country to levels not seen in decades,” Yardi Matrix says in the multifamily report.

“Rent growth will not be able to continue at these levels indefinitely, but conditions for above-average growth are likely to persist for months,” the report says.

Highlights of the multifamily rent-growth report

  • Multifamily asking rents increased by 6.3 percent on a year-over-year basis in June. “This is the largest year-over-year national increase in the history of our data set,” the report says.
  • Rents grew an amazing $23 in June to $1,482—another record-breaking increase. Lifestyle rents are growing at a faster pace than Renter-by-Necessity rents, “something we have not seen since 2011 and another sign of a hot market.”
  • Single-family (Built-to-Rent) rents grew even faster, at an 11 percent year-over-year pace.
  • “To be clear, the increases represent growth in what landlords are asking for (in) unleased apartments. Increases are smaller for tenants that are rolling over existing leases.”

Oregon Valley Rental Housing Journal August 2021

July 2021

Rental Housing Journal Metro Portland July 2021

Portland rents have increased 1.7 percent over the past month, and are now up 2.5 percent year-over-year, according to the June report from Apartment List.

Now, median rents in Portland are $1,197 for a one-bedroom apartment and $1,396 for a two-bedroom.

These increases are part of the fifth straight month that the city has seen rent increases. The last decline in rents came in January.

However, Portland’s year-over-year rent growth lags the state average of 7.3 percent, as well as the national average of 8.4 percent.

Portland Rents Continue 5-Month Climb

Rents Rising in All Major Cities Across Portland Metro

Of the 10 largest cities in the Portland metro for which Apartment List has data, all have seen prices rise. Oregon as a whole logged rent growth of 7.3 percent over the past year.

Here’s a look at how rents compare across some of the largest cities in the metro.

  • Lake Oswego is the most expensive of all Portland metro’s major cities, with a median two-bedroom rent of $2,068.
  • Hillsboro rents have increased 4.4 percent over the past month, and have increased sharply by 16.9 percent in comparison to the same time last year. Currently, median rents in Hillsboro are at $1,585 for a one-bedroom apartment and $1,740 for a two-bedroom.
  • Beaverton rents have increased 2.4 percent over the past month, and have increased sharply by 11.0 percent in comparison to the same time last year. Currently, median rents in Beaverton stand at $1,409 for a one-bedroom apartment and $1,710 for a two-bedroom.
  • Vancouver rents have increased 2.0 percent over the past month, and have increased sharply by 15.4 percent in comparison to the same time last year. Currently, median rents in Vancouver stand at $1,298 for a one-bedroom apartment and $1,533 for a two-bedroom.

Valley

Rental Housing Journal Oregon Valley July 2021

June 2021

Oregon Metro Portland Rental Housing Journal June 2021

Oregon SB 278 moves some of the burden from landlords to tenants, and tenants must provide to the landlord documentation verifying they are seeking rental assistance as attorney Brad Kraus explains here.

Bradley S. Kraus
Attorney at Law, Warren Allen LLP

During nearly every month over the past year, executive or legislative discussions or actions were in motion to change Oregon landlord-tenant law in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Couple these with the multitude of often different local laws enacted during those same months, and how anyone expected everyday landlords to keep up is unclear.

This past month was no different. The Oregon legislature, deciding the tenant protections they just enacted in Senate Bill 282 were not enough, subsequently passed Senate Bill 278.

This new law creates an opportunity for a tenant to put off any non-payment eviction notice, or enforcement action of the same, if one has been served, for 60 days if certain conditions are met. However, unlike previous tenant protections, the burden to invoke these protections is now properly placed within SB 278—on the tenant. Further, SB 278 makes up for some shortcomings in prior laws related to the Landlord Compensation Fund, correcting the same via this subsequent legislative action.

As an overview, Senate Bill 278 does not change the fact that July’s rent is due and owing on time. Senate Bill 278 creates an odd “if/then” framework related to tenant protections, depending on where a landlord is in the eviction process. To invoke the protections provided by SB 278, the tenant must provide to the landlord documentation verifying they are seeking rental assistance. This documentation can be provided through nearly any method to the landlord, including email or text message.

If a landlord receives this verification, then a 60-day stay to the process commences, and further action is either prohibited—or required—of the landlord. For example, if the landlord has not yet served a Non-Payment of Rent notice and documentation consistent with SB 278 is provided, the landlord is prohibited from serving that notice for 60 days. If no rental assistance is received for 60 days covering the amounts due and owing for that period and the preceding 60-day period, the landlord may serve a Non-Payment Notice thereafter, and no further stays may be invoked by the tenant.

If the landlord has served a Non-Payment Notice—or has commenced eviction proceedings—the tenant may still invoke the protections by providing the landlord documentation at any time, including at or before the first appearance. If this occurs, the landlord cannot continue with the eviction if it is filed, and the court must stay the eviction and schedule a new first appearance no earlier than 60 days later. If rental assistance is procured and the landlord receives the rent, the eviction must be dismissed. If rental assistance is not procured, the landlord may continue with the eviction process at the reset date.

The above protections properly place the burden on the tenant—not the landlord—to seek out, and provide verification of, rental-assistance efforts. This is one correction that was desperately needed, as prior versions of COVID-related laws required no proof, documentation, or evidence of economic hardship, and were ripe for abuse. As an appropriate concession for these protections, Senate Bill 278 also corrected compensation issues that were built into HB 4401 and the Landlord Compensation Fund. It retroactively compensates landlords the 20 percent unpaid rent they were forced to waive in conjunction with access to the Landlord Compensation Fund monies.

Far too often throughout the past year, the executive and legislative actions taken during COVID-19 placed burdens on landlords for a situation not of their making.

I spoke to many landlords over that time, and none took issue with assisting those who were actually affected by the pandemic. While it is unfortunate that the legislature enacted this law due to its inability to get rental assistance out the door, SB 278’s protections require the appropriate party to act to invoke the same. Further, it assists with making landlords whole, correcting HB 4401’s rent-waiver requirements.

Oregon Valley Rental Housing Journal June 2021

May 2021

Portland Metro Rental Housing Journal Oregon May 2021

Oregon Valley Rental Housing Journal May 2021

April 2021

Oregon Metro Rental Housing Journal April 2021

Oregon Valley Rental Housing Journal April 2021

March 2021

Rental Housing Journal Oregon Metro Portland and Valley

February 2021

Rental Housing Journal Metro Portland Oregon February 2021

Valley

Oregon Valley Rental Housing Journal February 2021

January 2021

Rental Housing Journal Portland Metro January 2021

Rental Housing Journal Oregon Valley January 2021

 

December

Portland Metro Rental Housing Journal December 2020

Valley

Oregon Valley Rental Housing Journal December 2020

November

Portland Metro Rental Housing Journal November 2020

Valley

Oregon Valley Rental Housing Journal November 2020

October

Portland Metro Rental Housing Journal October 2020

Valley

Oregon Valley Rental Housing Journal October 2020

September

Rental Housing Journal Oregon Metro September 2020 the Spectrum Trade Show issue with helpful, useful information for landlords and property managers

August 

Metro Portland Rental Housing Journal August 2020

Rental Housing Journal Oregon Valley August 2020

July 2020

Metro Portland Rental Housing Journal July 2020

Oregon Valley Rental Housing Journal July 2020

Portland Metro and Valley Rental Housing Journal June 2020

Rental Housing Journal Portland Metro June 2020

Valley June 2020

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RHJ Valley-June2020-FINALo

Portland Metro and Valley Rental Housing Journal May 2020

Portland Metro Rental Housing Journal May 2020

Valley May 2020

Rental Housing Journal Oregon Valley May 2020

Portland Metro and Valley Rental Housing Journal April 2020

Rental Housing Journal Portland Metro and Oregon Valley April 2020

Valley for April

Portland Metro and Valley Rental Housing Journal March 2020

Portland Metro Rental Housing Journal March 2020

Oregon Valley Rental Housing Journal March 2020

Portland Metro and Valley Rental Housing Journal February 2020

Portland Metro Rental Housing Journal February 2020

Valley

Rental Housing Journal Oregon Valley February 2020

 

Rental Housing Journal Portland Metro and Valley Editions January 2020

Portland Metro Rental Housing Journal January 2020

Oregon Valley Rental Housing Journal January 2020

Rental Housing Journal Portland Metro and Valley Editions December 2019

Rental Housing Journal Portland Metro December 2019

Rental Housing Journal Oregon Valley Edition December 2019

Rental Housing Journal Portland Metro and Valley Editions November 2019

Rental Housing Journal Portland Metro November 2019

Rental Housing Journal Oregon Valley Edition November 2019

Portland Metro and Valley Editions October 2019

Rental Housing Journal Portland Metro October 2019

Rental Housing Journal Oregon Valley Edition October 2019

Rental Housing Journal Portland Metro and Valley Editions September 2019

Rental Housing Journal Metro Portland September 2019

Click here for Valley edition

Rental Housing Journal Oregon Valley Edition September 2019

Rental Housing Journal Portland Metro and Valley Editions August 2019

Rental Housing Journal Portland Metro Edition August 2019

Valley Edition

Rental Housing Journal Oregon Valley August 2019

Rental Housing Journal Metro Portland and Valley Editions July 2019

Rental Housing Journal Metro Portland July 2019

Rental Housing Journal Oregon Valley Edition 2019

Rental Housing Journal Metro Portland and Valley Editions June 2019

Portland rents decline again for the month and are flat year-over-year.

Eugene, Salem rents decline in Oregon for the second straight month.

Rental Housing Journal Metro Portland and Valley Print Editions May 2019

Rental Housing Journal Print Publication May 2019 with helpful useful information for property managers and landlords of multifamily housing

Oregon valley rental housing journal May 2019 helpful, useful information for property managers and landlords

Rental Housing Journal Metro Portland and Valley Print Editions April 2019

Rental Housing Journal Portland Metro April 2019

 

Rental Housing Journal Oregon Valley Edition April 2019

Rental Housing Journal Metro Portland and Valley Print Editions March 2019

Rental Housing Journal Portland Metro March 2019

Rental Housing Journal Portland Metro and Valley March 2019

Rental Housing Journal Metro Portland and Valley Print Editions-February 2019

Rental Housing Journal Metro Portland February 2019

 

Rental Housing Journal Valley Edition For February 2019

 

Rental Housing Journal Metro Portland And Valley Print Editions – January 2019

Rental Housing Journal Portland Metro Edition January 2019

Rental Housing Journal Oregon Valley Edition January 2019

Rental Housing Journal Oregon Metro And Valley Print Editions – December 2018

 

Oregon Metro Portland and Oregon Valley Rental Housing Journal

Rental Housing Journal Oregon Metro and Valley December 2018

Here you will find the most recent print editions of Rental Housing Journal Portland Oregon and the edition for the Oregon Valley.

The  Portland Oregon edition covers property management, landlords and rental property ownership in the Portland Metro area. The Oregon Valley issue covers rental housing issues, also including property management and rental property ownership in Eugene, Corvallis and Salem Oregon.

We cover the multifamily industry with the latest news, plus helpful useful content. Each month the publications are printed and mailed directly to multifamily professionals in the Oregon Metro area  including Metro Portland the the Oregon Valley.

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