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I Have A Tenant Couple Who Fight On A Regular Basis – What Do I Do?

Ask Landlord Hank this week is the question, “What do you do with a tenant couple who fight on a regular basis in your rental and calls the police ?”  Each week veteran landlord and property manager Hank Rossi answers questions from other landlords and property managers around the country about their rentals.

Dear Landlord Hank,

Hello Hank, I have a tenant couple that fight on a regular basis and call the police.

I do not want the police in my park.  I feel it makes for a bad reputation. Can I evict them? And how?

Thanks in advance. Debbie

Hi Landlady Debbie,

I’m not an attorney so I can’t give legal advice. I would look at your lease.

In my lease, in the section “USE OF PREMISES: Tenant shall maintain the premises in a clean and sanitary condition and not disturb surrounding residents or the peaceful and quiet enjoyment of the premises or surrounding premises.”

Tenant couple who fight

I would warn these tenants in writing that this kind of behavior will not be tolerated and is in violation of the lease.

Then I would talk to an attorney for advice.

This kind of conduct in your establishment will definitely lead to a bad reputation and it may attract exactly the kind of tenants you don’t want.

Good luck, Debbie.

Ask Landlord Hank Your Question

Ask veteran landlord and property manager Hank Rossi your questions from tenant screening to leases to pets and more! He provides answers each week to landlords.
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Ask Landlord Hank about a tenant couple who fight

About the author Landlord Hank:

“I started in real estate as a child watching my father take care of our family rentals- maintenance, tenant relations, etc , in small town Ohio. As I grew, I was occasionally Dad’s assistant. In the mid-90s I decided to get into the rental business on my own, as a sideline. In 2001, I retired from my profession and only managed my own investments, for the next 10 years. Six years ago, my sister, working as a rental agent/property manager in Sarasota, Florida convinced me to try the Florida lifestyle. I gave it a try and never looked back. A few years ago we started our own real estate brokerage. We focus on property management and leasing. I continue to manage my real estate portfolio here in Florida and Atlanta. “ Visit Hank’s website here.

 

Dear Landlord Hank: I have a tenant couple who fight. What do I do?

 

Photo credit wavebreakmedia via istockphoto.com

5 Questions Landlord Hank Asks Tenants When They Call

Coronavirus Causes Biggest Annual Rent-Growth Slowdown in at Least 5 Years

Coronavirus Causes Biggest Annual Rent-Growth Slowdown in at Least 5 Years

The pace of year-over-year growth saw the biggest one-month rent-growth slowdown since at least 2014, up just 2.9 percent in April after 3.4 percent growth in March. Rents fell in 16 major markets, according to a release from Zillow.

Rent prices had been chugging along at a remarkably stable pace since 2018, with the growth rate rarely rising or falling much from one month to the next. That changed in April, the first reading since the coronavirus pandemic struck the United States.

The rental market has been hit especially hard because people who are in jobs that faced the most layoffs and furloughs tend to be renters, Zillow said in the release. They also tend to spend more of their monthly income on rent, which means they have less ability to save in case of emergencies.

Skylar Olsen, senior principal economist at Zillow, said in the release that, “Housing was in a generally strong position before the pandemic, with low inventory and high prices shutting many would-be buyers out and creating unusually high demand for rentals.

“Rents soared, making it difficult for many to build emergency savings to tap into at a time like now,” he said.

Rent-growth slowdown

“We’re seeing rents slow now as some people are no doubt pursuing more-affordable options, such as moving back in with parents, moving to a less-expensive area, or doubling up in instances where it can be done safely,” Olsen said.

The for sale market continues upward

The for-sale market continues to show momentum, though. Newly pending sales are up 13 percent week over week and nearly 50 percent month over month as of the seven days ending May 10. And they are higher than last year in four large metros — Cleveland (up 10 percent year over year), Cincinnati (up 3.8 percent), Houston (up 2 percent), and Dallas-Fort Worth (up 0.9 percent).

Home values continued their upward trajectory in April, with the typical U.S. home value growing 4.3 percent year over year to $250,492. The pace of yearly home value growth has now accelerated every month this year after slowing for 20 consecutive months beginning in spring 2018.

Rent Growth Shows Significant 1-Month Decline

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3 Unexpected Costs Landlords Have When Tenants Move Out

unexpected costs landlords have when tenants move out

The unexpected costs landlords have when tenants move out can often be far more than the security deposit so this week’s maintenance tip from Keepe looks at potential costs landlords face.

It is common knowledge that tenants cannot live in a single rental property all their lives. They may move out because they got a new job or bought their own home, or they may have been evicted due to one issue or the other.

The big question is, what are the hidden costs you may face as a landlord or property manager when your tenants move out?

Some landlords have false hope that the rental deposit will be enough to cover upgrade costs and cleaning needs. But rarely do tenant deposits provide enough money to pay for everything needed to get a property ready for a new tenant.

Below is a list of unexpected costs landlords have or may face when your tenants move out.

No. 1 – Vacancy Loss

Vacancy loss is the amount of rental income or cash flow that a property is losing as a unit sits unoccupied.

Without money coming in, but with money going out to upgrade and repair the property, it won’t be long before landlords are struggling to make their own mortgage payments. Working with a property-management company is one of the best ways to reduce the risk of tenant turnover and to help find new tenants on time.

When your tenants show signs that they are going to leave and not renew their lease, you could respond by offering free utilities for two months, reducing rent slightly, or freezing it at current rental rates. You might also offer to enhance some aspect of the apartment/condo to increase their comfort. People don’t like to leave their comfort zone.

No. 2 – Property Damage

One of the biggest worries you might have as a landlord is that tenants may do significant damage to your rental property before they move out.

When a tenant packs up and moves out, and there is no way to get a hold of him or her, you run the risk of walking into a damaged unit. Some tenants will leave before the rent is paid or at night, and they leave behind a lot of damage. Having an effective tenant-screening process is the best way to find tenants who will care for the property.

No. 3 – Stolen Appliances and Other Property

Theft by tenants moving out of rental properties is very common.

In fact, “a poll of 2,000 adults by landlord insurer Direct Line for Business found tenants have removed items such as fridges, freezers, light fittings, televisions, and even sinks. Tenants estimate that the overall value of items they had taken from a property stands at more than $500.” It can feel devastating when a tenant steals your property upon moving out of the rental.

However, to avoid issues such as this, you must obtain a FULL tenant reference check before you go ahead with a tenancy.

This will provide you with detailed information on their financial security and place of work, which will assist in giving you peace of mind that you have selected a suitable tenant.

About Keepe:

Keepe is an on-demand maintenance solution for property managers and independent landlords. The company makes a network of hundreds of independent contractors and handymen available for maintenance projects at rental properties. Keepe is available in the Greater Seattle area, Greater Phoenix area, San Francisco Bay area, Portland, San Diego and is coming soon to an area near you. Learn more about Keepe at https://www.keepe.com.

4 Types of Problem Tenants and How to Deal with Them

unexpected costs landlords have when tenants move out
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Cities That Keep the Most Jobs During Downturns

durable jobs and Cities That Keep the Most Jobs During Downturns

Keeping jobs during downturns, often called “durable employment,” shows up much more in some cities than in others, according to new research from Yardi Matrix.

Job stability is key to tenants being able to pay rent in the multifamily industry, as well as to landlords who are struggling to collect rent during the pandemic.

Employment losses caused by the COVID-19 pandemic have been unevenly spread across the economy, so  Yardi Matrix  studied which metros have the highest concentration of jobs in finance, professional and technical services, and government—sectors that have lost the lowest proportion of jobs.

“Metros with the highest percentage of durable jobs generally are home to a government cap­ital, state university and/or strong presence of knowledge-based industries,” the report says.

Metros with the most durable jobs

  • Lansing, Mich. – 44 percent
  • Washington, D.C. – 41 percent
  • Sacramento – 34.5 percent

“All of which include fed­eral or state government capitals. The Lansing/ Ann Arbor metro also is home to the University of Michigan and Michigan State University.

“Washington has for decades been among the most consistently performing U.S. metro for com­mercial real estate because of the stability afford­ed by being the capital of the U.S. government. The presence of government-related industries that include lobbying, legal, trade groups, founda­tions, think tanks, etc., gives the metro an employ­ment base that is extremely stable,” the report says.

Cities That Keep the Most Jobs During Downturns

Finance jobs also help keep cities stable

Jobs in banking, insurance and real estate also help with “durable” jobs.

Roughly two-thirds (33) of the Yardi Matrix top 50 metros are above the na­tional average, which reflects the concentration of financial jobs in urban centers.

Metros with the highest percentage of jobs in this sector are:

  • New Haven, Conn. – 9.5 percent
  • Dallas – 9.3 percent
  • Jacksonville – 9.3 percent
  • Phoenix – 9.2 percent
  • Tampa – 8.8 percent

Jobs During Downturns Conclusion

“The goal of this study was to determine metros’ exposure to the job segments that have per­formed the best at the outset of the pandemic. The upshot is that having a base of government jobs (including state universities) and/or concen­trations of knowledge-based industries including (but not limited to) finance and technology should help metros weather the downturn,” the report says.

“Questions remain about the economy in com­ing quarters. Our study was based on jobs lost through April, and the composition of job losses may evolve. For example, government has lost rel­atively few jobs so far, but we could see massive layoffs of state employees if the federal govern­ment doesn’t provide aid to states. And the job picture could change rapidly as states begin to re­open. Most unemployment claims have been filed by furloughed workers that are subject to call­backs as the economies of those states reopen,” Yardi Matrix says in the report.

Download the full report here: Special research bulletin: Which Metros Have the Most Durable Employment Sectors?

Job Postings Still Strong for Apartment Industry

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Dear Landlord Hank: Running Children Upstairs Disturbing Downstairs Tenant What Do We Do?

Dear Landlord Hank: Running Children Upstairs Disturbing Downstairs Tenant What Do We Do?

The problem is back, again, with tenant complaints about noisy, running children. In this week’s Ask Landlord Hank question he deals with children upstairs distributing downstairs tenant and offers some advice. Hank is a veteran property manager and landlord and strives to help other landlords and property managers.

Dear Landlord Hank:

Our upstairs tenant has a young kid, around two-years-old, who runs around on the wood floor at random hours of the evening and into the night. The older downstairs tenant says this wakes her up. She has asked the upstairs tenant a couple of times about this issue, but the problem persists, and now she is calling us. We realize little kids run and play and understand it is loud on wood floors. Any suggestions on solving children upstairs disturbing downstairs tenant problem?
-Landlady Eileen

HI Landlady Eileen,

This is a touchy subject as babies run and fall down and make noise.

If the flooring is all solid surface, you could talk to your upstairs tenants and ask them to consider using some area rugs to dampen the noise of the little one running.

Make sure they know that the baby running can be heard by the downstairs neighbor and maybe they could control that behavior late evening.

If this doesn’t work, you could check into acoustic panels that attach to the ceiling in the unit below and will reduce the level of sound from above.

Thin walls in multifamily housing can be trying for the tenants. Good luck.

Sincerely
Hank Rossi

Ask Landlord Hank

Ask Landlord Hank Your Question

Ask veteran landlord and property manager Hank Rossi your questions from tenant screening to leases to pets and more! He provides answers each week to landlords.
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Visit the Ask Landlord Hank page here for more questions and answers

Do You Know The 5 Questions Landlord Hank Asks Tenants When They Call?

Dear Landlord Hank: My Tenant Wants To Repaint His Unit – What Should I Do?

About the author Landlord Hank:

“I started in real estate as a child watching my father take care of our family rentals- maintenance, tenant relations, etc , in small town Ohio. As I grew, I was occasionally Dad’s assistant. In the mid-90s I decided to get into the rental business on my own, as a sideline. In 2001, I retired from my profession and only managed my own investments, for the next 10 years. Six years ago, my sister, working as a rental agent/property manager in Sarasota, Florida convinced me to try the Florida lifestyle. I gave it a try and never looked back. A few years ago we started our own real estate brokerage. We focus on property management and leasing. I continue to manage my real estate portfolio here in Florida and Atlanta. “ Visit Hank’s website here.

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4 Types of Problem Tenants and How to Deal with Them

4 Types of Problem Tenants and How to Deal with Them

Problem tenants are time-consuming so here are some suggestions on how to handle things from Keepe the maintenance company.

Every property manager will at some point have to deal with a problem tenant. In fact, you might already be dealing with a few of them. If so, you know how challenging it can be to get them to modify their behavior so that things go back to being copasetic for you, them, and the other tenants in the building.

In this article, we go over a few types of problem tenants and the steps you should take when dealing with them.

No. 1 – Noisy Tenants

Every rental property has one or two tenants who are known for their loud music, chattering, and disturbance.

If your tenant is intentionally or unintentionally disturbing their neighbors, ask them why they’re doing it and come up with a compromise. For example, if they are musicians and their practice sessions are too loud, ask them to either rent a studio or install soundproofing sheets to their wall. If the issue continues, you may request that they leave the apartment based on failure to adhere to peaceful living conditions.

No. 2 – Late-Rent Payment or Non-Paying Tenants

Everybody faces financial problems at some point in their life.

But what happens when your tenant is always weeks or even months behind on their rent payments? Do you evict them at once or continue giving them a period of grace? While your humane side may want to provide them with more time to pay, especially if it is their first time, maintaining a rental property costs money.

The best ways to handle this issue is to offer your tenants the option to include roommates in the lease agreement to split the rent or allow the tenant to break the lease by simply asking them to leave.

No 3 – The Complainers

Some renters, you hardly hear from.

Others call regularly, making one unnecessary request after another: The AC doesn’t seem to be working quite right (though it’s been checked out twice in three days); there’s not enough hot water; a door is sticking – and so on. There are calls even about minor things you’d expect them to handle themselves or the lease require that they do.

The best way to handle these types of tenants or issues is to politely but firmly address the tenant about the lease and their responsibilities.

No. 4 – Destroyers

On the list of most common problems with renters, property damage comes right after late rent payers.

A common and costly mistake that most property managers make is to rush into action and lock the tenant out of the apartment without taking the proper steps and precautions.

You may end up losing the entire security deposit and even get sued by the tenant for spoiled food and utility bills. In some states, you may be fined up to $100 per day if the tenant is locked out of the rental.

If your tenant is still in the apartment, you’ll need to provide a notice-of-intent-to-enter-the-premises form, which will allow you to document any damages. Upon documentation of the damages, you may request that the tenant leave the unit.

Problem tenants conclusion

Dealing with problem tenants can be tiring and time-consuming. The best way to avoid renting your property to problem tenants is to prequalify all intending renters.

About Keepe:

Keepe is an on-demand maintenance solution for property managers and independent landlords. The company makes a network of hundreds of independent contractors and handymen available for maintenance projects at rental properties. Keepe is available in the Greater Seattle area, Greater Phoenix area, San Francisco Bay area, Portland, San Diego and is coming soon to an area near you. Learn more about Keepe at https://www.keepe.com.

4 Types of Problem Tenants and How to Deal with Them
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Common Tenant Complaints and How to Handle Them

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Residential Rental Companies Lose $4.6 Million Annually to Fraudulent Rental Applications

Are Fraudulent Rental Applications a Risk to Your Business?

Two-thirds of property managers say they’ve fallen victim to fraudulent rental applications, which drive higher evictions, property damage, and criminal activity, according to a new survey.

Applicant fraud has increased nine percent month-over-month since the COVID-19 crisis hit—a likely response to the current economic climate as well as recent changes to local and state eviction moratoriums, according to the 2020 Fraud in the Rental Industry Survey from Snappt.

The typical property manager reports that 15 percent of their online rental applications exhibit obvious fraud, with an additional 10 percent of fraudulent applications slipping through unnoticed.

“There are a number of factors that are fueling the increase in fraudulent rental applications,” said Daniel Berlind, CEO and co-founder of Snappt, in the release.

“The increasing number of self-employed applicants, a move to online rental applications, and the increasing availability of tools to fraudulently alter financial documentation, all make the problem more common,” he said.

Two in five (41 percent) property managers say fraudulent applications are somewhat to extremely common; they report an annual eviction rate of 12 percent.

Thirty-four percent reported annual eviction rates of 20 percent or higher.

Residential Rental Companies Lose $4.6 Million Annually to Fraudulent Rental Applications

Fraudulent rental applications can involve document alterations

According to the survey, one of the biggest issues is spotting fraudulent documents. Using the documents provided by applicants, property managers must look for alterations manually.

The survey said that those taking the survey report it takes four hours to vet an application and one in five report it takes more than 10 hours. Fifty-eight percent rate this task as somewhat to extremely challenging and half say it takes too long to do manually.

Top rental application issues

The top five problems reported by property managers who allowed tenants slip through with fraudulent rental applications in leases include:

  • Costs associated with having to evict bad tenants
  • Physical damage to the property
  • Missing out on renting to good tenants
  • Criminal activity at the property
  • Loss of reputation

The full ‘2020 Fraud in the Rental Industry’ survey is available at www.snappt.com/confronting-costs-tenant-fraud

About Snappt

Snappt, a Los Angeles based real estate technology company, provides data-driven fraud detection services that can accurately spot fraudulent documentation. Snappt is used by three of the top six property management firms in the country, the company says.

Are Fraudulent Rental Applications a Risk to Your Business?

 

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In a 1031 Exchange? Why waiting until after COVID-19 to complete your exchange could potentially be a bad idea

In a 1031 Exchange? Why waiting until after COVID-19 to complete your exchange could potentially be a bad idea

As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic the IRS issued Notice 2020-23 which provided a multitude of tax extensions including the extension of the 1031 exchange deadlines. The typical investor in a 1031 exchange will have 45 days from the sale date to identify a replacement property, and 180 days to complete the purchase of that same property. With the IRS’ notice the 45-day, and 180-day deadline has been extended until July 15th 2020 for anyone who originally had their 45th day, or their 180th day fall between April 1, 2020 and July 15th 2020.

One example of how this could affect someone in a 1031 exchange would be if they had sold their property on April 3, 2020 their 45th day would have been May 18, 2020 and they would have had to formally identify their replacement property by then. Under the new guidelines if they completed their sale on April 3, 2020 they would have until July 15, 2020 to identify a replacement property.

While the extensions were provided for good reason, the unintended consequence may result in demand for quality exchangeable real estate exceeding the available supply in the first two weeks of July. Alex Madden, Vice President with Kay Properties and Investments explained “The sale of a property often requires many months to complete and we have seen many of those sales move forward during COVID-19, but very few new offerings have come to the market for 1031 exchange investors to use as a replacement property. With exchangers extending their identification and purchase dates until July 15th it is a very real possibility that they may face fierce competition over replacement properties when they do finally need to complete their exchange. I don’t think we have ever had a time in America where every single 1031 exchanger had the same deadline date.”

Many localities have seen a significant drop in real estate listings since the outbreak of COVID-19 which means there may be less properties available for investors who are in the midst of a 1031 exchange. With less real estate coming to market one potential outcome for affected 1031 exchangers may result in overpaying for a replacement property.

Madden went on to say “We have seen a slowdown in the real estate sector during COVID-19, and a result may potentially be that ‘turn-key’ 1031 exchange solutions like Delaware Statutory Trust offerings (DSTs) could become more scare. 1031 exchange investors may prefer products like the DST as the deadline approaches because the financing, and due-diligence are already in place and it’s possible to complete a purchase in three to five business days typically.”

Many 1031 exchange investors are rightly taking a re-evaluation of the marketplace in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, but with every 1031 exchanger in America facing the exact same deadline on July 15th there is a very real potential for overpayment, deals to fall through, and maybe even failed exchanges for those who wait until the last moment due to inventory running dry.

About Kay Properties and www.kpi1031.com

 Kay Properties is a national Delaware Statutory Trust (DST) investment firm. The www.kpi1031.com platform provides access to the marketplace of DSTs from over 25 different sponsor companies, custom DSTs only available to Kay clients, independent advice on DST sponsor companies, full due diligence and vetting on each DST (typically 20-40 DSTs) and a DST secondary market.  Kay Properties team members collectively have over 115 years of real estate experience, are licensed in all 50 states, and have participated in over 15 Billion of DST 1031 investments.

This material does not constitute an offer to sell nor a solicitation of an offer to buy any security. Such offers can be made only by the confidential Private Placement Memorandum (the “Memorandum”). Please read the entire Memorandum paying special attention to the risk section prior investing.  IRC Section 1031, IRC Section 1033 and IRC Section 721 are complex tax codes therefore you should consult your tax or legal professional for details regarding your situation.  There are material risks associated with investing in real estate securities including illiquidity, vacancies, general market conditions and competition, lack of operating history, interest rate risks, general risks of owning/operating commercial and multifamily properties, financing risks, potential adverse tax consequences, general economic risks, development risks and long hold periods. There is a risk of loss of the entire investment principal. Past performance is not a guarantee of future results. Potential cash flow, potential returns and potential appreciation are not guaranteed.

Securities offered through WealthForge Securities, LLC. Member FINRA/SIPC. Kay Properties and Investments, LLC and WealthForge Securities, LLC are separate entities.

Job Postings Still Strong for Apartment Industry

Job Postings Still Strong for Apartment Industry

Job postings for the apartment industry have seen little fluctuation during the pandemic so far, as more than 9,700 apartment jobs were available during April, accounting for 42.2 percent of the broader real estate sector, according to the National Apartment Association.

While the coronavirus has caused devastating effects on the labor market – the U.S unemployment rate in April experienced the largest monthly increase in history, climbing 10.3 percentage points to 14.7 percent – the apartment industry did not see the same impact.

According to data from Burning Glass Technologies, between mid-March and the second week of April, online job postings declined by 30 percent compared to the beginning of 2020, according to the NAAEI Apartment Jobs Snapshot April 2020.

Markets that ranked highest for vacancies included San Antonio, Houston, Austin, Kansas City, and San Diego.

This month’s edition of the jobs report highlights property manager/community manager positions, with a median salary of $58,411.

In addition to property-management experience, employers are seeking candidates with strong budgeting skills, staff-management skills, and experience with propert- management software.

Salaries for property managers were particularly competitive in Raleigh, as demand for experienced professionals was more than three times the national average.

Job Postings Still Strong for Apartment Industry
Job Postings Still Strong for Apartment Industry

National apartment association jobs report background

“Our education institute is a credentialing body for the apartment industry. They hear often that one of the biggest problems keeping our industry leaders up at night is the difficulty in finding talent, attracting talent and retaining talent,” NAAEI’s Paula Munger said.  “Labor-market issues are happening in a lot of industries, certainly with the tight labor market we have.”

Assistant Property Manager Jobs In Demand

So NAA partnered with Burning Glass Technologies. “They have a labor-job posting database that is proprietary,” she said, and they can “layer on data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). We looked at that and thought we could do something that is really going to help the industry and help benchmark job titles and trends as we go forward.”

Demand for Apartment Jobs Reached Record Levels In 2019

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Ask Landlord Hank: How Do We Get Our Renters to Move So Family Can Move In?

Ask Landlord Hank: How Do We Get Our Renters to Move So Family Can Move In?

In this week’s Ask Landlord Hank question, he gives his thoughts on  how to get renters to move out so family can move in the time of eviction moratoria and covid-19.

Dear Landlord Hank: I generously gave my current renters three months’ notice in February, as I have family I need to rent to. The tenants were agreeable, but then the virus hit and they hadn’t been looking because they thought they had plenty of time.

They are now refusing to leave, despite having the money to pay rent, saying that there is nothing I can do because of the moratorium. My brother has been affected and needs a place to live as soon as possible. Is there a way I can legally evict them for landlord causes? It sounded like the moratorium potentially could go until August!

-Jennifer

Dear Landlady Jennifer,

The Federal Housing Finance Agency recently announced that the eviction moratorium on single-family homes would be extended until June 30, 2020.

This only applies if you have a mortgage held by Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac.  “During this national health emergency, no one should be forced from their home,” wrote FHFA Director Mark Calabria. “Extending the foreclosure and eviction moratoriums protects homeowners and renters with an enterprise-backed mortgage, and provides certainty for families.”

All that being said, this is for single-family homes. Do you have a multifamily structure, OR a single-family home with no mortgage or a mortgage NOT held by Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac?

I would contact my local court system and talk to someone there for advice, then call the local sheriff’s department to see if they are enforcing dispossessory actions right now.

Depending upon what you find out, if you don’t get the information you need, then contact an attorney that specializes in landlord-tenant law.

This is a very tough time for all of us right now. The good part of this equation is that you are still receiving your rent on this property.

Sincerely,

Hank Rossi

Renting during the moratorium ask Landlord Hank

Ask Landlord Hank Your Question

Ask veteran landlord and property manager Hank Rossi your questions from tenant screening to leases to pets and more! He provides answers each week to landlords.
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Visit the Ask Landlord Hank Page Here For More Questions And Answers

Ask Landlord Hank: What Should We Do About A Hoarder?

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